How stories are used in bridging the gap between LS and RW skills in teaching English

Use of stories in bridging LS and RW

Use of stories in bridging LS and RW

As it is already a known fact that there are 2 main sections in the English Nali-Kali curriculum. The 2 sections are - Listening and Speaking (L&S) and Reading and Writing (R&W).

In the L&S section, students involve in listening and speaking activities, and in R&W section the focus is on reading and writing.

It is obviously can never be denied that no individual skill can be taught in isolation among LSRW skills. The 4 basic skills of language learning - LSWR go hand-in-hand.

If the students are taught these 4 skills in isolation, certainly there will be a gap created in connecting all the 4 skills, thus the objective of language teaching would fail to some extent.

To achieve the objective, the teacher needs to fill the gap created between the L&S and R&W sections in the ENK classroom.

A few days ago, we discussed how stories play a key role in teaching English. The Story Telling segment comes under L&S section of ENK. Go back and re-read the Story Telling segment once again if you wish to.

Today's article will take you through how these stories can bridge the gap between L&S and R&W sections.

How to build competency in reading?

Phonemic teaching of a new language can easily fall into the trap of teaching random words based on word families where children can read individual words but are not able to read larger passages with meaning. Apart from understanding the text (vocabulary), the speed of reading also plays an essential part in reading with understanding. Practice in reading and enjoyment of text is therefore an important part of language learning.


Stories strike a fine balance between L&S and R&W

The bridge between the oral and the reading and writing curriculum is met through the storytelling. Stories strike a fine balance between the theme for the month (based on the EVS curriculum) and the word list developed within the R and W curriculum. 

A set of seven readers are developed around the words taught to children across the milestones. Weaving a story using the words introduced to them, helps students place the words learned within a context. The readers are developed as a continuum and revolve around each of the themes. The whole story is written on the left page of the reader and the main points of the story are written in the key sentences which are placed on the facing page along with pictures that depict the storyline.

How stories form the bridge between L&S and R&W

Let's take the theme of the month Manasa’s Family  in the Listening and Speaking segment.

In the same month, students are taught the cluster of letters  C, O, A, P, and T along with the word families ‘at’, ‘ap’, ‘ot’, ‘op’ R&W segment.

Use of stories in bridging LS and RW
Story bridge between LS and RW

Now, the story titled Toto and the Cap is about the cat family. The keywords in the story Toto and the Cap are Cat, Pat, Cot, Cap, Tap, Top, Papa, and Toto. At the same time, students are also exposed to sight words such as this, is, a, the, in, and, on in the reading and writing segment. 

These sight words are also used in the key sentences of the story such as - This is toto cat, This is papa cat, Papa cat has a cap, The cap is in the pot, The pot is on the cot and The cap is on toto cat.
This helps students read the sight words in context and as a result, they read the story with meaning and enjoy the reading experience.

Watch this video for a better understanding of how stories form the bridge between LS & RW.


Let us sum up

  • The bridge between the oral and the reading and writing curriculum is met through storytelling.
  • Stories strike a fine balance between the theme for the month and the word list developed within the R and W curriculum.
  • The cluster of letters word families and sight words of R&W segment is introduced in the context in the key sentences of stories used in the L&S segment.
  • The context provided by the story help students understand what they read and enjoy the reading experience.

 



Credits: Samagra Shikshana Karnataka and UNICEF


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